How To: Find the area of a parallelogram using geometry

The video shows us how to find the area of parallelogram using geometry. Here in this video it is done by using an example where the parallelogram is given ABCD. The area of the parallelogram is base times height (bh). Here the base is given as 15 but the height is not known but it is represented by the segment BD. To find the value of h, let’s use right triangle BDC on the right side of the figure. Since base is 15 and the opposite side of the parallelogram is congruent, the hypotenuse of th...

How To: Mod a Bresser Biolux NG or AL microscope to view larger objects

This free video science lesson from YouTube's bionerd23 demonstrates a simple technique for modding a Bresser Biolux NG or Bresser Biolux AL microscope to view larger objects like minerals. You'll also learn how to mod your microscope to allow you to take pictures and shoot video through it. For all of the relevant details and detailed, step-by-step instructions, watch this home-science how-to.

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Do long division with decimals

Video Nerd thinks that when your doing long division with decimals you should first take out the decimal. Write the number as if it didn't have a decimal. For example if the problem was 12.5 divided by 5 then you will just use 125 and divide that by 5. Next divide the first digit of the dividend by the divisor an write the number up top. Next you multiply, after your done multiplying the numbers subtract, and when your done subtracting the numbers drop the reaming numbers in the dividend down...

How To: Write A Letter From Teachers To Parents

Parental involvement is a crucial ingredient in the success of many children. Teachers know the saying all too well that it takes more than a village to raise a child, for one - it takes parental involvement. Thus, it is important for teachers to reach out to parents in that first week of school. Teachers should write a formal letter that is welcoming and easily comprehensible to the parent and the student. This letter should be able to communicate that the teacher values the child’s educatio...

How To: Find the area of a triangle when given 2 sides & angle

This video shows you how to easily find the area of a triangle when you know the length of 2 sides and the angle between them. The first thing you have to do is mark the sides of the triangle by a, b, c, where a is the side between A and B, b is the side between B and C and c is the side between C and A. If you know 2 of these 3 sides an you know the angle between them you can find the area of the triangle very simple: Area= (a x b x sin c)/2, where a, b are the two sides and c is the angle b...

How To: Find a number given Its percent

This how-to video is about how to find a number when its percent is given. This video is really helpful and effective in finding the number when the percent is given, the following steps are explained in the video to find the number when its percent is given:

How To: Use a TI-89 to calculate nCr

This video shows you how to do a mathematical representation on computing the nCr function using a TI-89 calculator. You can write the nCr notation in different forms. It can be simplified from nCr to C(n,r). The symbol can either be read "n choose r" or "n taken r at a time" which are from it's probability applications. On the example to find "26 choose 17", go to the Home screen of the TI-89 calculator and then go 2nd 5 which is Math. Go choose probability and then to nCr to type in (26,17)...

How To: Figure out the domain & range of a piecewise function

Need to calculate the domain and range of a graphed piecewise function? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Prove a triangle inscribed in a circle is right angled

When a triangle is inserted in a circle in such a way that one of the side of the triangle is diameter of the circle then the triangle is right triangle. To prove this first draw the figure of a circle. Now draw a diameter to it. It can be any line passing through the center of the circle and touching the sides of it. Now making this as the side of a triangle draw two lines from the ends of the diameter to a point on the circle. Now join the center of the circle to the other vertex of the cir...

How To: Find the perimeter & area of a complex figure

In this video tutorial the author shows how to find the perimeter and area of a complex figure. He shows that a complex figure can be subdivided into standard geometric figures. In the current example he divides the complex figure into a rectangle and a triangle. Now he computes the perimeter by adding the three sides of the rectangle and the two sides of the triangle. Similarly he computes the individual areas of the rectangle and the triangle and finally adds then up to find the area of the...

How To: Solve a line integral over a closed path

Line integrals will no longer be the feared terrorist of the math world thanks to this helpful guide from the Khan Academy. Marvel at the ease in which the integral is taken over a closed path and solved definitively. Then take out a sheet of paper and see if you can do the same.

How To: Apply the 4th Law of Exponents

This how-to video is about Fourth Law of Exponents. Before going to see this let's first know what the fourth law of exponent says. The fourth law of exponents says that "any value other than zero brought to an exponent of zero is equal to one".

How To: Use differential equations to solve for velocity

The guy first gives the definition of differential equations. He explains that a differential equation is an equation that contains the derivatives of an unknown function. He then gives some examples of differential equation and explains what the equation's order means. After that he gives an example on how to solve a simple equation. He calculates it and gives examples of graphs. Then he explains what a general solution is and how to narrow down the number of solutions using data from the pr...

How To: Find the length of a side of a triangle using cosine

To find the length of a side of a triangle using cosine, you first need to find the angle and which sides are given. After you determine the angle and given sides, you'll need to figure out which trigonometric ratio to use. If you are given the adjacent side and the hypotenuse, you need to use cosine to solve. The degree equals adjacent divided by hypotenuse. In the example, Cos 39=3.5/x. After simplifying the equation, we found x to be 4.49. If the directions ask you to round, be sure to rou...

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Recognize and analyze iambic pentameter

Meter, specifically iambic pentameter, can be used to analyze a poem. Iambic pentameter is used in poetry and drama and describes a particular rhythm that words establish in each line. Rhythm is created through the stressing and un-stressing of syllables. Small groups of syllables are called feet. A foot is a group of two or three syllables and will often contain a stressed and an unstressed syllable. Iambic describes the type of foot that is used. Pentameter indicates that a line of poetry h...

How To: Do long multiplication

In this video the instructor gives you sample as of how to SLEP long multiplication. You start by breaking the numbers up to simpler forms. If you have a two digit number that your multiplying by a another two digit number you multiply the first two digit number and then buy the second digit of the second two digit number. You have to remember to carry the remainders. You then add your two multiplicative lines together giving you the sum. this can be done to cover any set of multi-digit numbe...

How To: Do long division without a calculator

This video shows you step by step how to do long division without the use of a calculator. The video shows viewers two different ways to solve a division problem. It first shows how to do the problem the traditional way, then it shows how to do it according to the long division process. The long division process is where you write the whole division, multiplication, and subtraction process out showing all your work. Long division is mainly used when dividing large numbers. There are three com...

How To: Find a slope of a straight line with: Ax + By + C = 0

In this video the instructor shows how to find the slope of an equation which is in the form Ax + By + C = 0. He says that the formula to find the slope of a line in the above form is slope m = -A/B, where A and B are the numeric constants of the variables x and y in the given equation. He goes on and further shows how to do this with a couple of examples. He shows how to reduce any equation into the general form and how to apply the slope formula then. This video shows how to find the slope ...

How To: Solve equations with the order of operations

In mathematics, the order of operations define the priority in which complex equations are solved. The top priority is your parenthesis, then exponents, followed by multiplication and division, and finally addition and subtraction (PEMDAS). This video tutorial demonstrates the order of operation with various examples and explains the associated methodology. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autod...

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