How To: Find the area of a triangle when given 2 sides & angle

This video shows you how to easily find the area of a triangle when you know the length of 2 sides and the angle between them. The first thing you have to do is mark the sides of the triangle by a, b, c, where a is the side between A and B, b is the side between B and C and c is the side between C and A. If you know 2 of these 3 sides an you know the angle between them you can find the area of the triangle very simple: Area= (a x b x sin c)/2, where a, b are the two sides and c is the angle b...

How To: Prove a triangle inscribed in a circle is right angled

When a triangle is inserted in a circle in such a way that one of the side of the triangle is diameter of the circle then the triangle is right triangle. To prove this first draw the figure of a circle. Now draw a diameter to it. It can be any line passing through the center of the circle and touching the sides of it. Now making this as the side of a triangle draw two lines from the ends of the diameter to a point on the circle. Now join the center of the circle to the other vertex of the cir...

How To: Find a number given Its percent

This how-to video is about how to find a number when its percent is given. This video is really helpful and effective in finding the number when the percent is given, the following steps are explained in the video to find the number when its percent is given:

How To: Find the circumference of a circle

Use a simple mathematical formula to find the circumference of a circle. The circumference of a circle can be determined by using the formula 2 times pi times the circle's radius. Pi is equal to 3.14. If a circle's radius is 10 centimeters, first multiply pi times 2. Pi, or 3.14, times 2 is 6.28. The next step then is to multiply 6.28 times the circle's radius. Since the circle's radius is 10 centimeters, multiply it by 6.28. This gives you 60.28. 60.28 inches, then, is the circumference of t...

How To: Rationalize square roots

In this tutorial, we learn how to rationalize square roots. You cannot have square roots in the denominator of an equation. You need to multiply so the square root goes away. You can do this by multiplying the top and bottom of the equation by the bottom denominator. From here, this will make the square root go away, so your equation will be normal numbers. After you have done this, you will have the equation answered and you will be able to simplify it to find the end answer. You can do this...

How To: Get your official SAT score from College Board online

The SATs are a very valuable college entrance test and could determine if you're accepted or denied to your favorite university. So, once you've learned to ace the SATs and have already taken your test, get your scores as soon as they're out! Don't sit in dreaded anticipation— go to College Board and get your SAT test results now!

How To: Analyze cheap sulfuric acid for concentration & purity

In this home scientist video the instructor Robert Bruce talks about cheap sulfuric acid. He says that sulfuric acid is very important in any lab both as a reagent and a precursor for preparing other chemicals. He points to the battery acid saying that it is a good source of sulfuric acid which is 35% concentrated. Now he shows various methods to obtained sulfuric acid and shows how to test one of the thus obtained sulfuric acid for its concentration. In this video the author talks about sulf...

How To: Understand the basics of trigonometry

Learn and understand the basics of Trigonometry in this entertaining video. Taught by an experienced YayMath instructor, viewers gain knowledge in the study of trigonometry: the relationship of angles and the triangles they are in. Trigonometry is relevant in many forms of everyday living and careers including architecture. Watch as the experienced instructor gives easy-to-follow instructions and examples including solving "x for y" equations using the 'SOHCAHTOA' method, an abbreviation for ...

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Write A Letter From Teachers To Parents

Parental involvement is a crucial ingredient in the success of many children. Teachers know the saying all too well that it takes more than a village to raise a child, for one - it takes parental involvement. Thus, it is important for teachers to reach out to parents in that first week of school. Teachers should write a formal letter that is welcoming and easily comprehensible to the parent and the student. This letter should be able to communicate that the teacher values the child’s educatio...

How To: Find the area of an oblique triangle using formulas

In this tutorial the instructor shows how to find the area of an oblique triangle using different formulas. To find the area of an oblique triangle there are different formulae. The first formula to calculate the area of a triangle is area A = (1/2) * a * b * Sin(C), where a and b are the lengths of the two sides of the triangle and C is the value of the angle of the triangle that lies in between the two sides a, b. Now substitute these values in the given formula to find the area if you have...

How To: Make hydrochloric acid from salt

In this tutorial, we learn how to make hydrochloric acid from salt. First, you will pour some salt into a distil flask. After this, you will add in some concentrated sulfuric acid to the salt. Next, you will let these react with each other. You will start to see gasses bubble up and the excess hydrogen chloride gas come out through the top of the tube. To create a stronger reaction, you can add heat underneath the reaction. Then, test this by exposing it to ammonium chloride. If it's the righ...

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Find a slope of a line parallel/perpendicular to it

This video tells you how to find a slope of a parallel / perpendicular to it. In the equation y = mx + c, m is the slope. To calculate the slope of a line that is parallel to another line, you have to consider the rule m1 = m2 which means slope of the first line m1 is equal to the second line m2, if both the lines are parallel. Take the equation y = 2/3x - 7.2/3 is the slope. According to the rule m1 = 2/3 and so m2 = 2/3.Now to calculate the slope of perpendicular line you have another rule ...

How To: Solve equations with the order of operations

In mathematics, the order of operations define the priority in which complex equations are solved. The top priority is your parenthesis, then exponents, followed by multiplication and division, and finally addition and subtraction (PEMDAS). This video tutorial demonstrates the order of operation with various examples and explains the associated methodology. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autod...

How To: Find and sketch the domain of a multivariable function

Looking for a primer on how to find and sketch the domain of a function z = f(x, y) in calculus? Learn how with this free video calc lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Determine the age of a fossil using carbon-14

If you have a fossil, you can tell how old it is by the carbon 14 dating method. This is a formula which helps you to date a fossil by its carbon. If a fossil contains 60% of its original carbon, how old is the fossil? The half life of carbon 14 is 5600 years. That means this is how long it takes for half the nuclei to decay. After 5600 years, if we start with a gram, we end up with half a gram. This rather complex formula shows you how to solve this puzzle using accepted scientific methods.

How To: Identify characteristics of a sample during a survey

To identify characteristics of a sample in your survey, there are many factors to consider of your samples. The first four characteristics you need to focus on are gender, age, income level, and education level. All four of these characteristics must be proportional to that of the population. You also need to consider the geographic location. Only take samples from the immediate geographical area. Finally, an important characteristic of the survey is the sample size. You do not want to ask to...

How To: Perform the Barus effect

Watch this instructional science video to observe the Barus effect in action. A dyed solution of POLYOX (polyethylene oxide - it is the stuff used as the lubricant on the strip found in all modern razors) is extruded from a 50 mL syringe. On exit, a marked swelling in the liquid stream several times the diameter of the orifice is observed. The effect is referred to as the Barus Effect, but it also goes by several other names including the Merrington Effect, Die Swell, and Extrudate Swell.

How To: Divide small numbers by big numbers

This is a mathematical educational video on how to divide a small number by a larger number. You are aware that it is easy to divide a larger number by a small number. For example, if you want to divide 379 by 9 it is easy to do so. But if you have to divide 9 by 379 it is a bit difficult. You have to add a zero and see if you can divide. You need to add one more zero so that you can divide 900 by 379. But you should know that the answer would start like this 0.0 as we have added 2 zeros alre...

How To: Find extra points for a parabola (quadractic equation)

This is a mathematical educational video on how to find extra points for a parabola. In the first two examples there is no need for finding extra points as they have five points and have zeros of the parabola. In example 3 we need to find extra points. The equation is y=4xsquare-4x+4. You can take x= -1 and get the value for y. You will get a point now. Similarly you can substitute -2 for x in the same equation and get the value for y. Now you get another point. Now you can draw the parabola.

How To: Find the perimeter & area of a complex figure

In this video tutorial the author shows how to find the perimeter and area of a complex figure. He shows that a complex figure can be subdivided into standard geometric figures. In the current example he divides the complex figure into a rectangle and a triangle. Now he computes the perimeter by adding the three sides of the rectangle and the two sides of the triangle. Similarly he computes the individual areas of the rectangle and the triangle and finally adds then up to find the area of the...

How To: Write a sum/difference of logarithms as a logarithm

To write the sum or difference of logarithms as a single logarithm, you will need to learn a few rules. The rules are ln AB = ln A + ln B. This is the addition rule. The multiplication rule of logarithm states that ln A/b = ln A - ln B. The third rule of logarithms that deals with exponents states that ln (M power r) = r * ln M. Using these three rules you can simplify any expression that involves logarithms to arrive at a single logarithm. The instructor shows how to apply these rules to a f...

How To: Find a slope of a straight line with: Ax + By + C = 0

In this video the instructor shows how to find the slope of an equation which is in the form Ax + By + C = 0. He says that the formula to find the slope of a line in the above form is slope m = -A/B, where A and B are the numeric constants of the variables x and y in the given equation. He goes on and further shows how to do this with a couple of examples. He shows how to reduce any equation into the general form and how to apply the slope formula then. This video shows how to find the slope ...

How To: Make boric acid from borax

This is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to make boric acid from borax. For this experiment you will need borax (disodium tetra borate) and conc. hydrochloric acid. Take 25 ml of hydrochloric acid and dilute it with 75 ml of water. Next take 6 - 7 gms of borax and dissolve it in boiling water. Now add equal amount of hydrochloric acid. Crystals of boric acid will start forming. They are completely insoluble in cold water. After about half an hour, fi...

How To: Make maganese heptoxide (permanganic acid)

This video tutorial is in the Education category which will show you how to make manganese heptoxide (permanganic acid). This procedure is extremely dangerous. Manganese heptoxide is an extremely powerful oxidizing agent. It has the ability to set fuels on fire from mere contact. Get an old dish and put a spatula full of potassium permanganate on it. Add a few drops of concentrated sulphuric acid. A green liquid is formed which is the manganese heptoxide. Now you can add any fuel like butanol...

How To: Calculate the height and volume of a pyramid

Need to know how to calculate the height and volume of a pyramid in geometry? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

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