How To: Find the 100th term in a sequence

Need to find the nth term in a given arithmetic sequence? See how it's done with this free video math lesson. Need help finding the From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's seri...

How To: Do long division without a calculator

This video shows you step by step how to do long division without the use of a calculator. The video shows viewers two different ways to solve a division problem. It first shows how to do the problem the traditional way, then it shows how to do it according to the long division process. The long division process is where you write the whole division, multiplication, and subtraction process out showing all your work. Long division is mainly used when dividing large numbers. There are three com...

How to Be Your Own SpaceX: Design, Build & Test Liquid-Fueled Rocket Engines

Move over NASA— SpaceX is taking over. Well, not really. But today, the privately funded spacecraft company broke all expectations when their Dragon capsule fell to a soft landing in the Pacific Ocean, completing an undoubtedly successful demo flight of nearly two full trips around Earth. It was the first re-entry of a commercial spacecraft ever, bringing commercial space transportation closer to reality.

How To: Learn Calculus in 20 minutes

Did you sleep all semester in your Calculus class? Are you just waking up now to realize you have a test on Monday and that you're totally screwed? Well, luckily you can learn an entire semester worth of Calculus in just twenty minutes... or at leasts that's the hope.

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Prove Rank(A) = Rank(transpose of A) in linear algebra

Learn how to prove that the rank of a matrix, A, is equal to the rank of its transpose in linear algebra. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Factor a trinomial with negative leading coefficient

In this video the instructor shows how to factor a trinomial with negative leading coefficient. Most of the students are confused when they have to factor a trinomial with a negative leading coefficient. But there are many ways to solve these kind of problems as shown in this video. One way you can do is that take out the greatest common factor (GCF) of -1 from the equation. So pulling the -1 gives you the original trinomial with all the signs of the terms changed. Now go on and factor the ne...

How To: Know if matrices can be multiplied

In this Education video tutorial you will learn how to know if matrices can be multiplied. If the column of the first and the row of the second match, you can multiply them. For example if, matrix A has 2 rows and 3 columns (A: 2x3) and matrix B has 3 rows and 4 columns (B: 3x4), then you can multiply them. But, if A: 3x2 and B: 3x4, you cannot multiply them. The shape of the resultant matrix will be the shape of the outer numbers. For example, we saw that if A:2x3 and B :3x2, then they can b...

How To: Multiply & Divide Numbers (Basic Elementary Math)

Adding and subtracting may be the easiest of mathematical operations, but once you get it down, multiplication and division can be just as easy. That's why it's called elementary arithmetic. If it were harder, it would be called college algebra or trigonometry. But it's not— it's basic math, and once you get your head around the numbers, you'll never hate math class again! (Okay, maybe you will.)

How To: Make a permanent, reusable glow stick

Make a reusable glow stick, glow-in-the-dark-style! Imagine, you'll never have to buy one of those ChemLite's again, because you can reuse this homemade glow stick over and over again. This video tutorial will show you how to make a permanent, reusable glow stick. The materials in this experiment are simple: epoxy resin, straw, and some phosphor powder.

How To: Understand nth roots and operations on radicals

This video teaches us the concept of nth roots. The video starts with the square root of constants. We find the number which when multiplies by itself for two times results in the constant inside the square root. Then we find the square root of variables. Here again the same concept is used. We find the variable which when multiplied by itself for two times results in the given variable. Then we find the cube root. Here we find the number which when multiplied by itself for three times result...

How To: Make elemental sulfur (sulphur)

This video tutorial is in the Education category which will show you how to make elemental sulfur (sulphur). The chemicals you need are nitric acid and sodium thiosulphate. The reaction produces toxic SO2 gas so keep it coved with a watch glass. Put 12.9 grams of sodium thiosulphate in a beaker and dissolve it in minimum amount of water. Pour about 15ml of nitric acid in to the beaker. Let it sit in a warm place for a couple of hours and the sulphur will settle at the bottom of the beaker. Th...

How To: Make verdigris with copper and vinegar

In this tutorial, we learn how to make verdigris with copper and vinegar. Verdigris is a compound of copper that is blue and powder. You will need: copper metal, vinegar, a big jug, and a small beaker. Now, place the small beaker inside of the jar, then fill the bottom with vinegar. Next, put the piece of copper metal inside of the jar making sure it sits inside the small beaker. Seal this and put it in a safe and dry place. Leave it for a good month, then when you come back you will have a n...

How To: Solve a 2x2 system of linear equations with inverses

See how to solve a two-by-two system of linear equations using inverses (derived from determinants). Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Find velocity, acceleration, & distance by graphing

See how to calculate velocity from a distance time graph, how to calculate acceleration from a velocity time graph and how to calculate distance covered from a velocity time graph! From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Write A Letter From Teachers To Parents

Parental involvement is a crucial ingredient in the success of many children. Teachers know the saying all too well that it takes more than a village to raise a child, for one - it takes parental involvement. Thus, it is important for teachers to reach out to parents in that first week of school. Teachers should write a formal letter that is welcoming and easily comprehensible to the parent and the student. This letter should be able to communicate that the teacher values the child’s educatio...

How To: Divide small numbers by big numbers

This is a mathematical educational video on how to divide a small number by a larger number. You are aware that it is easy to divide a larger number by a small number. For example, if you want to divide 379 by 9 it is easy to do so. But if you have to divide 9 by 379 it is a bit difficult. You have to add a zero and see if you can divide. You need to add one more zero so that you can divide 900 by 379. But you should know that the answer would start like this 0.0 as we have added 2 zeros alre...

How To: Find the area & perimeter of triangles & squares

When you are figuring the area of a square, you only need to know the height and width of the shape. Once you know the height and width, multiply them to get the area of the square. To find the perimeter of the square, add all four sides together. To find the area of a triangle, multiply together two of the sides (not the hypotenuse) and then multiply that figure by 1/2. To find the perimeter of the triangle, add all three sides together.

How To: Get your official SAT score from College Board online

The SATs are a very valuable college entrance test and could determine if you're accepted or denied to your favorite university. So, once you've learned to ace the SATs and have already taken your test, get your scores as soon as they're out! Don't sit in dreaded anticipation— go to College Board and get your SAT test results now!

How To: Make boric acid from borax

This is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to make boric acid from borax. For this experiment you will need borax (disodium tetra borate) and conc. hydrochloric acid. Take 25 ml of hydrochloric acid and dilute it with 75 ml of water. Next take 6 - 7 gms of borax and dissolve it in boiling water. Now add equal amount of hydrochloric acid. Crystals of boric acid will start forming. They are completely insoluble in cold water. After about half an hour, fi...

How To: Calculate the area of a parallelogram

Calculating The Area Of A Parallelogram A parallelogram is a 4-sided shape formed by two pairs of parallel lines. Opposite sides are equal in length and opposite angles are equal in measure. To find the area of a parallelogram, multiply the base by the height. The formula is:

How To: Solve equations with the order of operations

In mathematics, the order of operations define the priority in which complex equations are solved. The top priority is your parenthesis, then exponents, followed by multiplication and division, and finally addition and subtraction (PEMDAS). This video tutorial demonstrates the order of operation with various examples and explains the associated methodology. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autod...

How To: Find the slope from a set of points

To find the slope of a line you must have two points and then you must plug in the two points into the slope formula. The slope formula is m= y2-y1 over x2-x1. If the slope is a fraction be sure to reduce to the lowest. Remember if a number is divided into zero it is zero, if zero is divided into the number it is undefined. A calculator can help one remember this. Horizontal lines have slopes and vertical lines do not. Drawing the lines on a graph can help you see the actual slopes and which ...

How To: Do normal probability calculations on a calculator

Probability computation is a complex process and even using a calculator can be difficult. But normal probability calculations can be performed quickly with the help of calculator once you know how to use it. So when you have to calculate a probability from a normal distribution you can use the functions on your scientific calculator. You can use the normal CDF function from you calculator to compute the area under a normal curve. The function requires lower band and upper band values, the me...

How To: Write a logarithm as a sum or difference of logarithms

This video shows the method to write a logarithm as a sum or difference of logarithms. The square root of the term given is taken out as half according to the rule. Then the numerator and denominator is divided into product of factors. This is broken into the difference of numerator and denominator according to the rule. Finally, the product of factors is expressed as the sum of factors. Now we see the domain of the term. As the term is a square root of the term it should be greater than zero...

How To: Do long division with decimals

Video Nerd thinks that when your doing long division with decimals you should first take out the decimal. Write the number as if it didn't have a decimal. For example if the problem was 12.5 divided by 5 then you will just use 125 and divide that by 5. Next divide the first digit of the dividend by the divisor an write the number up top. Next you multiply, after your done multiplying the numbers subtract, and when your done subtracting the numbers drop the reaming numbers in the dividend down...

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

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