How To: Graph linear equations with a table of values

The author teaches us how to graph the linear equations with tables. Given a set of linear equations in terms of "x and y", first we have to draw a table having a column each for x and y. We have to enter an arbitrary value of x in that table and substitute that value in the given equation to get the corresponding y value. Once you obtain both x and y values, the next step is to plot them in a graph. Consider an example: in the linear equation x=2y,on substituting an arbitrary value of x=2,we...

How To: Bisect a line segment

In this tutorial, we learn how to bisect a line segment. First, you need to adjust your compass so the distance from the sharp part and the drawing part is the size of the line. Then, put the sharp part on one side and draw your arc with the pencil. Do this on both sides of the line so your image shows two arcs that intersect each other. Since you have these two intersecting lines, you can draw a line between these to show where the middle of the line would be. Use a ruler to draw this straig...

How To: Simplify a radical expression including variables

Want to simplify a radical expression with algebraic variables? See how it's done with this free video algebra lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just study for that next big test).

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Find standard deviation

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to calculate the standard deviation of a data set. The standard deviation of a statistical population, a data set, or a probability distribution is the square root of its variance. To calculate the standard deviation, users will need to follow these steps. 1) Find the mean of the data. 2) Subtract the mean from each data point. 3) Square each of the values you got in step 2. 4) Then find the mean of the values you get from step 3. 5) Finally, square r...

How To: Write A Letter From Teachers To Parents

Parental involvement is a crucial ingredient in the success of many children. Teachers know the saying all too well that it takes more than a village to raise a child, for one - it takes parental involvement. Thus, it is important for teachers to reach out to parents in that first week of school. Teachers should write a formal letter that is welcoming and easily comprehensible to the parent and the student. This letter should be able to communicate that the teacher values the child’s educatio...

How To: Get your official SAT score from College Board online

The SATs are a very valuable college entrance test and could determine if you're accepted or denied to your favorite university. So, once you've learned to ace the SATs and have already taken your test, get your scores as soon as they're out! Don't sit in dreaded anticipation— go to College Board and get your SAT test results now!

How To: Make hydrochloric acid from salt

In this tutorial, we learn how to make hydrochloric acid from salt. First, you will pour some salt into a distil flask. After this, you will add in some concentrated sulfuric acid to the salt. Next, you will let these react with each other. You will start to see gasses bubble up and the excess hydrogen chloride gas come out through the top of the tube. To create a stronger reaction, you can add heat underneath the reaction. Then, test this by exposing it to ammonium chloride. If it's the righ...

How To: Find the standard deviation with the Z-Score formula

In this tutorial, we learn how to find the standard deviation with the Z-Score formula. First, take your problem and write it out one by one underneath each other. Then, you will need to substitute the numbers in for the variables that are in the problem. Once you do this, you will follow the basic rules of math to find out what the answer to the problem is appropriately. Once you have done this, finish off the problem to find the answer, then you will have found the standard deviation using ...

How To: Tie off a suspension ring for rope bondage

If you're planning on doing some bondage knots, you better learn how to do it right. This video shows you how to properly tie off a titanium suspension ring for use in your bondage activities. This video is clear and straight forward, using a large piece of rope, making it easy to see exactly how it's done. Remember to be careful with your S&M knots, especially if you're suspending someone's weight.

How To: Make nitric acid

Watch this science video tutorial from Nurd Rage on how to make nitric acid. They show three ways to make nitric acid based on two different chemical approaches, both of which can be done using easily accessible materials.

How To: Discover the Hidden Colors in Everyday Objects with This DIY Video Spectrometer

A spectrometer is a device that splits light into all of the different colors it's composed of that can't be seen with the naked eye. It does this by using a prism to refract or bend the light. Jeffrey Warren over at Public Labs created a tutorial showing how you can make your own video spectrometer and create spectra like the one pictured below. Any guesses as to what the subject is? Believe it or not, that's what whipped cream looks like when viewed through a spectrometer. You can do this w...

How To: Make iodine easily

In this video, we learn how to make iodine easily. You will need potassium iodine and sulfuric acid to make this. First, add the acid into the potassium iodine slowly. After you add in each part, swirl the beaker slowly so it gets mixed together. After you have added in all of the potassium, you will place this into a beaker filled with ice water while you add in more, because the mixture gets really hot. When finished, you will end up with a mixture that is iodine and nothing else. Fill with...

How To: Prove a triangle inscribed in a circle is right angled

When a triangle is inserted in a circle in such a way that one of the side of the triangle is diameter of the circle then the triangle is right triangle. To prove this first draw the figure of a circle. Now draw a diameter to it. It can be any line passing through the center of the circle and touching the sides of it. Now making this as the side of a triangle draw two lines from the ends of the diameter to a point on the circle. Now join the center of the circle to the other vertex of the cir...

How To: Cancel out in basic algebra

This video gives you brief tutorial on simplifying expressions, or canceling out common factors. He starts out by answering the question "What is canceling?" and demonstrates a basic example. You find the greatest common factor between the numerator and denominator, which you then divide both by. This can also be done if you have variables in your fraction. He then shows it can be done the same way if you have binomials in your fractions. However, you must be careful that the denominator does...

How To: Find the percentage of a number

In this tutorial the author explains of how to compute percentages of a given number. He explains that x percent of some number y is x multiplied by y and divided by 100. He says that of means multiply and percentage means for hundred. He goes on and explains this concept with numerous examples. He suggests a small trick to move the decimal point of a number two digits to the left to get it divided by hundred. The author demonstrates many more similar tricks and short cuts using which one can...

How To: Multiply Any Number by 11 with a Super Fast Mental Trick

Most of the time, when I’m bored during math class, I play with my calculator to satisfy my boredom. Recently, I've discovered that when multiplying any number by 11, 111, or any number similar to it, that it has a pattern (though I guess everything in math has a pattern). I don't know if this technique is original, because I didn't read anything about this. It's just mere observation. If it’s a tried and true technique, let me know.

How To: Multiply & Divide Numbers (Basic Elementary Math)

Adding and subtracting may be the easiest of mathematical operations, but once you get it down, multiplication and division can be just as easy. That's why it's called elementary arithmetic. If it were harder, it would be called college algebra or trigonometry. But it's not— it's basic math, and once you get your head around the numbers, you'll never hate math class again! (Okay, maybe you will.)

How To: Determine the empirical and molecular formulas for a compound in chemistry

In this free video science lesson from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan, you'll learn how to determine the empircal and molecular formulas of a substance given percent composition. Whether you need help studying for that next big test or could just use a hand finishing your homework, you're sure to be well served by this video lesson. For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

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