How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Remember "greater than" & "less than" symbols

This video shows you how to easily remember "greater than" and "less than" math symbols. The first thing you have to remember is that "less than" symbol looks like the letter L ("less than" symbol is "<"). When you see this sign, remember that < looks like L and means "less than". The other symbol, "greater than" does not look like the letter L, therefore it cannot be "less than" and it's easier to remember. The "greater than" symbol is ">". That's it! Good Luck!

How To: Write A Letter From Teachers To Parents

Parental involvement is a crucial ingredient in the success of many children. Teachers know the saying all too well that it takes more than a village to raise a child, for one - it takes parental involvement. Thus, it is important for teachers to reach out to parents in that first week of school. Teachers should write a formal letter that is welcoming and easily comprehensible to the parent and the student. This letter should be able to communicate that the teacher values the child’s educatio...

Make Slime Without Borax: 5 Easy Recipes for Gooey Homemade Ooze

One of the only things I remember from watching Nickelodeon as a kid is the epic green slime. Looking back, I don't know what was so great about it, but every kid my age thought that being drenched in slime would be the coolest thing on earth. Of course, the first thing I did was beg my parents to buy me some fake slime, but I never knew I could've easily made my own at home. One of the most common ways to make slime is to combine liquid glue with water and a household chemical called borax. ...

How To: Do long division without a calculator

This video shows you step by step how to do long division without the use of a calculator. The video shows viewers two different ways to solve a division problem. It first shows how to do the problem the traditional way, then it shows how to do it according to the long division process. The long division process is where you write the whole division, multiplication, and subtraction process out showing all your work. Long division is mainly used when dividing large numbers. There are three com...

How To: Find the formula of a piecewise function given a graph

This video shows how to find the formula of a piecewise function when given a graph. The first step is to write a definition for the graph, which is done by identifying the different domains shown in the graph. The second step is writing formulas for each domain specified by the lines in the graph. The point-slope formula is used to identify the slope and y-intercept for the leftmost domain, which has a sloped line. A point and horizontal line make for simpler equations in the other pieces of...

How To: Find a number given Its percent

This how-to video is about how to find a number when its percent is given. This video is really helpful and effective in finding the number when the percent is given, the following steps are explained in the video to find the number when its percent is given:

How To: Figure out the domain & range of a piecewise function

Need to calculate the domain and range of a graphed piecewise function? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Make Potassium Chlorate from Ordinary Household Bleach and Salt Substitute

If you're not just a chemistry nerd, but also a firearms freak and explosives nut, then this home brew chemistry concoction is just what you need for some cheap homemade potassium chlorate. It's a mixture of potassium, chlorine and oxygen (KClO3) and is used for such things as gun primers, propellents, and explosives (when mixed with the appropriate fuel). And guess what? NurdRage is going to show you the steps for this makeshift potassium chlorate.

How To: Simplify fourth roots

In this video the instructor shows how to find out the fourth roots of a number. The properties of fourth root says that for any positive number of a, its fourth roots are real. And for any negative value a, its fourth roots are not real. So split the number inside the fourth root as the product of two perfect squares and then cancel out the power with the fourth root giving its roots. As the fourth roots of a positive number are real, the answer you get is correct. But you cannot find out th...

How To: Make hot ice using Sodium Acetate Trihydrate

This video in the Education category will show you how to make hot ice using Sodium Acetate Trihydrate. For this purpose you will need a pan, 100g of Sodium Acetate Trihydrate, 25ml of water, a wooden spoon and a glass. Take the Sodium Acetate Trihydrate and put 100g in the pan. Then place the pan on a stove and turn to medium heat. The Sodium Acetate Trihydrate will start to melt. In about five minutes when it has melted fully, add 25ml of water. Let the solution simmer for two minutes while...

How To: Divide small numbers by big numbers

This is a mathematical educational video on how to divide a small number by a larger number. You are aware that it is easy to divide a larger number by a small number. For example, if you want to divide 379 by 9 it is easy to do so. But if you have to divide 9 by 379 it is a bit difficult. You have to add a zero and see if you can divide. You need to add one more zero so that you can divide 900 by 379. But you should know that the answer would start like this 0.0 as we have added 2 zeros alre...

How To: Write a slope-intercept equation given an X-Y table

In this tutorial the author shows how to derive a slope-intercept equation of a line given an X-Y table. He explains that the general form of slope intercept form which is y = m*x + b. Now he intends to find value of slope, i.e. m first. Now slope is change in y over change in x. He computes the slope using the X-Y values from the table. Next he substitutes a pair of x, y value in the equation to compute the value of y intercept b. Now finally substituting the values in the equation the slop-...

How To: Find the area of a parallelogram using geometry

The video shows us how to find the area of parallelogram using geometry. Here in this video it is done by using an example where the parallelogram is given ABCD. The area of the parallelogram is base times height (bh). Here the base is given as 15 but the height is not known but it is represented by the segment BD. To find the value of h, let’s use right triangle BDC on the right side of the figure. Since base is 15 and the opposite side of the parallelogram is congruent, the hypotenuse of th...

How To: Make fireballs you can hold in your hand

This flame you CAN hold, without burning your skin off. Learn to make fireballs you can hold in your hand. This amazing video tutorial shows you how to do it. All you'll need for this little science experiment or fiery weapon is 100% cotton cloth, scissors, lighter fuel, cotton string, and a needle. Be careful to follow the directions in this how-to video carefully otherwise you'll really be playing with fire.

How To: Simplify cube roots

In this video, the narrator presents the viewer with a quick, painless way of simplifying cube roots. The narrator presents many methods to simplify square roots to appeal to different learning styles. By doing things like dividing the power by the root to figure out the power of a number x, the viewer is better able to tackle square-rooting numbers that may not have friendly roots. The video gets more complex as it goes on, eventually teaching the viewer to split the inside of a root up if t...

How To: Find the coordinate of a point

In this video the author shows how to plot a point on the coordinate plane. He explains about the coordinate plane and shows how to read and write points to it with an example. He says that any point on the coordinate plane has an x, y- coordinate values. He says that for any point its projection on the x-axis is its x-coordinate and the points projection on y-axis is its y-coordinate. He shows how to find this out for a sample value and plots the coordinates of it. In this video the author u...

How To: Find the highest common factor (or HCF) of two numbers

Need to figure out the highest common factor of two numbers? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Make Your Own Homemade Glow Sticks

Glow sticks, a popular favor at parties and outdoor events, and a must-have on Halloween, can be traced back to the United States Navy in the mid-1960s. The military desired improved visibility during night operations, and glow sticks, with their small-size portability and lack of batteries, were a perfect tactical solution.

How To: Find the 100th term in a sequence

Need to find the nth term in a given arithmetic sequence? See how it's done with this free video math lesson. Need help finding the From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's seri...

How To: Determine the age of a fossil using carbon-14

If you have a fossil, you can tell how old it is by the carbon 14 dating method. This is a formula which helps you to date a fossil by its carbon. If a fossil contains 60% of its original carbon, how old is the fossil? The half life of carbon 14 is 5600 years. That means this is how long it takes for half the nuclei to decay. After 5600 years, if we start with a gram, we end up with half a gram. This rather complex formula shows you how to solve this puzzle using accepted scientific methods.

How To: Derive the area of a circle

This video is about deriving the area of a circle of radius 'r' using polar co-ordinate. First, we draw a circle and its radius 'r'. Then draw another radius close to it, so that it forms a small triangle-like figure. To find the area of the complete circle, divide the circle into similar small triangles. The area of each triangle is given by half the product of its perpendicular and the base. We give the angle between the two radii as d?. We get the area of the small triangle by substituting...

How To: Find the area of a rectangle

The area of a rectangle is the basis for all geometry. You will need to know how to do this in order to better understand other objects. This video tutorial will show you the formula for area of a rectangle and how to use it. Don't be confused in math class anymore.

How To: Find the value of a variable in an algebraic equation

Need help figuring out how to solve simple algebraic equations? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

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