Make Slime Without Borax: 5 Easy Recipes for Gooey Homemade Ooze

One of the only things I remember from watching Nickelodeon as a kid is the epic green slime. Looking back, I don't know what was so great about it, but every kid my age thought that being drenched in slime would be the coolest thing on earth. Of course, the first thing I did was beg my parents to buy me some fake slime, but I never knew I could've easily made my own at home. One of the most common ways to make slime is to combine liquid glue with water and a household chemical called borax. ...

How To: Find the area of a parallelogram using geometry

The video shows us how to find the area of parallelogram using geometry. Here in this video it is done by using an example where the parallelogram is given ABCD. The area of the parallelogram is base times height (bh). Here the base is given as 15 but the height is not known but it is represented by the segment BD. To find the value of h, let’s use right triangle BDC on the right side of the figure. Since base is 15 and the opposite side of the parallelogram is congruent, the hypotenuse of th...

How To: Make Potassium Chlorate from Ordinary Household Bleach and Salt Substitute

If you're not just a chemistry nerd, but also a firearms freak and explosives nut, then this home brew chemistry concoction is just what you need for some cheap homemade potassium chlorate. It's a mixture of potassium, chlorine and oxygen (KClO3) and is used for such things as gun primers, propellents, and explosives (when mixed with the appropriate fuel). And guess what? NurdRage is going to show you the steps for this makeshift potassium chlorate.

How To: Remember "greater than" & "less than" symbols

This video shows you how to easily remember "greater than" and "less than" math symbols. The first thing you have to remember is that "less than" symbol looks like the letter L ("less than" symbol is "<"). When you see this sign, remember that < looks like L and means "less than". The other symbol, "greater than" does not look like the letter L, therefore it cannot be "less than" and it's easier to remember. The "greater than" symbol is ">". That's it! Good Luck!

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Write A Letter From Teachers To Parents

Parental involvement is a crucial ingredient in the success of many children. Teachers know the saying all too well that it takes more than a village to raise a child, for one - it takes parental involvement. Thus, it is important for teachers to reach out to parents in that first week of school. Teachers should write a formal letter that is welcoming and easily comprehensible to the parent and the student. This letter should be able to communicate that the teacher values the child’s educatio...

How To: Do long division without a calculator

This video shows you step by step how to do long division without the use of a calculator. The video shows viewers two different ways to solve a division problem. It first shows how to do the problem the traditional way, then it shows how to do it according to the long division process. The long division process is where you write the whole division, multiplication, and subtraction process out showing all your work. Long division is mainly used when dividing large numbers. There are three com...

How To: Make hydrochloric acid from salt

In this tutorial, we learn how to make hydrochloric acid from salt. First, you will pour some salt into a distil flask. After this, you will add in some concentrated sulfuric acid to the salt. Next, you will let these react with each other. You will start to see gasses bubble up and the excess hydrogen chloride gas come out through the top of the tube. To create a stronger reaction, you can add heat underneath the reaction. Then, test this by exposing it to ammonium chloride. If it's the righ...

How To: Translate a shape

Learn how to translate shapes with a few simple steps. - First step: Find the new verticals under the transformation which are T3,2. Values are A=(-5,-8), B=(-3,-4), C=(-8,-3), D=(-6,1). Find the points of the verticals on the graph and connect the points one by one until you can get one shape.

How To: Grow bacteria with agar & petri dishes

In this tutorial, we learn how to grow bacteria with agar and petri dishes. First, prepare your agar by swirling it and then pouring it into an open petri dish. Next, close the cap to the petri dish and let it sit for an hour. Next, grab a q-tip and swab it on a surface you prefer. After this, swab it onto the petri dish and let it sit for around a week. When you come back to the dish, you will see all the bacteria that has grown! This is a great science experiment to do for children in schoo...

How To: Dissect a lamb's heart

Pull out your scissors and get ready to dissect a heart! No scalpel needed! Just like your very own biology class, but in a video. Watching this lamb heart anatomy tutorial will show you the approximate workings of a human heart. You'll see how to start with just the tools and a heart, to learning the anatomy, like the ventricles and certain tissue.

How To: Find a number given Its percent

This how-to video is about how to find a number when its percent is given. This video is really helpful and effective in finding the number when the percent is given, the following steps are explained in the video to find the number when its percent is given:

How To: Make nitric acid

Watch this science video tutorial from Nurd Rage on how to make nitric acid. They show three ways to make nitric acid based on two different chemical approaches, both of which can be done using easily accessible materials.

How To: Divide small numbers by big numbers

This is a mathematical educational video on how to divide a small number by a larger number. You are aware that it is easy to divide a larger number by a small number. For example, if you want to divide 379 by 9 it is easy to do so. But if you have to divide 9 by 379 it is a bit difficult. You have to add a zero and see if you can divide. You need to add one more zero so that you can divide 900 by 379. But you should know that the answer would start like this 0.0 as we have added 2 zeros alre...

How To: Find the slope of a line given 2 points with fractions

In this video tutorial the instructor shows how to find the slope of a line given two points with fractional values. To do this first name your two points as point 1 with coordinates as x1, y1 and point 2 with coordinates x2, y2. Then substitute the values in the equation of the slope which is slope m = (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1). Now all you have to do is simply the fraction after substituting the point values. Be careful about the signs while substituting in the formula. Now finally after solvin...

How To: Find the area of a circle when you know the diameter

In this video, it is shown how to calculate the area of a circle where the diameter is given. The formula for calculating the area of a circle is pi multiplied by square of radius. Radius is actually half of the diameter. In this video, the diameter is given as 10.6 meters. Hence, the radius will be half of 10.6 which is equal to 5.3 meters. Now, to find the area we shall multiply pi with the square of 5.3. Square of 5.3 is 28.09. If we multiply 28.09 with pi we shall get the area of the circ...

How To: Find the area of a triangle when given 2 sides & angle

This video shows you how to easily find the area of a triangle when you know the length of 2 sides and the angle between them. The first thing you have to do is mark the sides of the triangle by a, b, c, where a is the side between A and B, b is the side between B and C and c is the side between C and A. If you know 2 of these 3 sides an you know the angle between them you can find the area of the triangle very simple: Area= (a x b x sin c)/2, where a, b are the two sides and c is the angle b...

How To: Use baby powder to reveal latent fingerprints

This short video shows us how to reveal latent fingerprints on a glass surface by dusting. Anyone interested in forensic science would enjoy trying it as it shows simple steps in dusting and lifting fingerprints. It does not require any chemicals and we can do it with baby powder. The steps involved are so simple and easy to follow that even kids can try it out for fun. This gives a clear idea about fingerprints on different objects like porous, non porous and metals. Enjoy viewing and detect...

How To: Perform ballistics comparisons

In this scientific video tutorial, undergraduate students in a forensic chemistry lab demonstrate how to use a comparison microscope for bullet and bullet casing comparisons, and color developments tests for impression marking enhancement (such as for filed-off serial numbers). Learn how to perform ballistics comparisons! Just like in CSI.

How To: Prove sin(a+b)=(cos a)(sin b)+(sin a)(cos b) in trig

Need help proving the sin(a+b)=(cos a)(sin b)+(sin a)(cos b) trigonometric identity? This free video lesson will show you how. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of...

How To: Make Your Own Homemade Glow Sticks

Glow sticks, a popular favor at parties and outdoor events, and a must-have on Halloween, can be traced back to the United States Navy in the mid-1960s. The military desired improved visibility during night operations, and glow sticks, with their small-size portability and lack of batteries, were a perfect tactical solution.

How To: Calculate the area of a parallelogram

Calculating The Area Of A Parallelogram A parallelogram is a 4-sided shape formed by two pairs of parallel lines. Opposite sides are equal in length and opposite angles are equal in measure. To find the area of a parallelogram, multiply the base by the height. The formula is:

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