Make Slime Without Borax: 5 Easy Recipes for Gooey Homemade Ooze

One of the only things I remember from watching Nickelodeon as a kid is the epic green slime. Looking back, I don't know what was so great about it, but every kid my age thought that being drenched in slime would be the coolest thing on earth. Of course, the first thing I did was beg my parents to buy me some fake slime, but I never knew I could've easily made my own at home. One of the most common ways to make slime is to combine liquid glue with water and a household chemical called borax. ...

How To: Find a number given Its percent

This how-to video is about how to find a number when its percent is given. This video is really helpful and effective in finding the number when the percent is given, the following steps are explained in the video to find the number when its percent is given:

How To: Make Your Own Homemade Glow Sticks

The first glow sticks were patented by the US Navy in the 70s, but back then, they were called "Chemiluminescent Signal Devices." Today, glow sticks are still used by the military, emergency services, campers, divers and, of course, ravers. I may be done with the glow-in-the-dark parties from my college days, but I still think glow sticks are pretty legit, and always thought it would be awesome to make some for myself. Talk about a cool application for all those boring chemistry lectures.

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Remember "greater than" & "less than" symbols

This video shows you how to easily remember "greater than" and "less than" math symbols. The first thing you have to remember is that "less than" symbol looks like the letter L ("less than" symbol is "<"). When you see this sign, remember that < looks like L and means "less than". The other symbol, "greater than" does not look like the letter L, therefore it cannot be "less than" and it's easier to remember. The "greater than" symbol is ">". That's it! Good Luck!

How To: Write A Letter From Teachers To Parents

Parental involvement is a crucial ingredient in the success of many children. Teachers know the saying all too well that it takes more than a village to raise a child, for one - it takes parental involvement. Thus, it is important for teachers to reach out to parents in that first week of school. Teachers should write a formal letter that is welcoming and easily comprehensible to the parent and the student. This letter should be able to communicate that the teacher values the child’s educatio...

How To: Solve problems involving functions in algebra

Need to know how to solve function problems in algebra? From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to work with and solve functions.

How To: Make (non-Newtonian) Oobleck from corn starch & water

Mr. O shows his audience in this video how to make oobleck, a slime-like substance which has a variety of unique properties. For this project, you will need a mixing bowl, food coloring, corn starch, a measuring cup, and water. First, color the water with food coloring to a color which is much darker than the color you would like. You will need the correct ratio of water to cornstarch, in a 1 to 2 ratio. Add some water to the bowl and add the cornstarch, then add the rest of the water. Finall...

How To: Use a Peltier module to create free electricity from heat

A Peltier module allows you to turn heat into electricity. Because you can place it in areas that are normally warm anyway, the electricity created is "free" in a sense, though it does work best when one side of the module is cold and the other is hot. In other words, all you'll need for this project is the Peltier module and a cooler surface such as soil or water, and a warm area such as a well lit window or warm pan.

How To: Make fireballs you can hold in your hand

This flame you CAN hold, without burning your skin off. Learn to make fireballs you can hold in your hand. This amazing video tutorial shows you how to do it. All you'll need for this little science experiment or fiery weapon is 100% cotton cloth, scissors, lighter fuel, cotton string, and a needle. Be careful to follow the directions in this how-to video carefully otherwise you'll really be playing with fire.

How To: Prove a triangle inscribed in a circle is right angled

When a triangle is inserted in a circle in such a way that one of the side of the triangle is diameter of the circle then the triangle is right triangle. To prove this first draw the figure of a circle. Now draw a diameter to it. It can be any line passing through the center of the circle and touching the sides of it. Now making this as the side of a triangle draw two lines from the ends of the diameter to a point on the circle. Now join the center of the circle to the other vertex of the cir...

How To: Graph a rational function using limits

Need help figuring out how to graph a rational function with limits? Learn how to graph a rational function using limits to find discontinuities and functional asymptotes with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Make Potassium Chlorate from Ordinary Household Bleach and Salt Substitute

If you're not just a chemistry nerd, but also a firearms freak and explosives nut, then this home brew chemistry concoction is just what you need for some cheap homemade potassium chlorate. It's a mixture of potassium, chlorine and oxygen (KClO3) and is used for such things as gun primers, propellents, and explosives (when mixed with the appropriate fuel). And guess what? NurdRage is going to show you the steps for this makeshift potassium chlorate.

How To: Find a missing side of a triangle, similar to another

In this tutorial the author shows how to find out the missing side of a triangle which is similar to an other triangle. He explains the concept of similar triangle using diagrams and by showing that similar triangles have equal corresponding angles and parallel sides. Now he labels sides of similar triangles and intends to find out the length of unknown side. Now in similar triangles, as the lengths of sides are proportionate he shows how to write a equation of proportion and solve it finding...

How To: Use baby powder to reveal latent fingerprints

This short video shows us how to reveal latent fingerprints on a glass surface by dusting. Anyone interested in forensic science would enjoy trying it as it shows simple steps in dusting and lifting fingerprints. It does not require any chemicals and we can do it with baby powder. The steps involved are so simple and easy to follow that even kids can try it out for fun. This gives a clear idea about fingerprints on different objects like porous, non porous and metals. Enjoy viewing and detect...

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Make nitric acid

Watch this science video tutorial from Nurd Rage on how to make nitric acid. They show three ways to make nitric acid based on two different chemical approaches, both of which can be done using easily accessible materials.

How To: Find extra points for a parabola (quadractic equation)

This is a mathematical educational video on how to find extra points for a parabola. In the first two examples there is no need for finding extra points as they have five points and have zeros of the parabola. In example 3 we need to find extra points. The equation is y=4xsquare-4x+4. You can take x= -1 and get the value for y. You will get a point now. Similarly you can substitute -2 for x in the same equation and get the value for y. Now you get another point. Now you can draw the parabola.

How To: Solve for the missing ratios or proportions

In this video the tutor shows how to solve the missing ratios or proportions. He explains it with an example, where a number in one of the ratios is missing and he intends to find this value. He shows the example of cross multiplication, where you multiply the values on the either side of the equation diagonally and finally solves the equation which results in the value of the unknown value. This is an introductory video explaining how to use rations and proportions to find missing values.

How To: Find density using the water displacement method

To find out the density of any given object there is a simple equation, mass divided by the volume equals the density. In this video a lady is showing how to get the volume of three objects using water. First the objects are measured on a scale to find out how much they weigh, the mass. Next each one of the objects is placed into a measured amount of water to find out the volume. Before you place the object into the water you will want to know just how much water in there. That way when the o...

How To: Find the equation of a line given 1 point

Need help figuring out how to find the equation of a line given a single point? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Clear fractions from linear equations in Algebra

Need help figuring out how to remove fractions from linear equations in algebra? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Identify characteristics of a sample during a survey

To identify characteristics of a sample in your survey, there are many factors to consider of your samples. The first four characteristics you need to focus on are gender, age, income level, and education level. All four of these characteristics must be proportional to that of the population. You also need to consider the geographic location. Only take samples from the immediate geographical area. Finally, an important characteristic of the survey is the sample size. You do not want to ask to...

How To: Simplify a quadratic formula result

In this video the tutor shows how to simplify a quadratic formula result. You can solve a quadratic equation using the quadratic formula. The first thing you have to do when given the quadratic equation is bring all the terms to one side so that you have a zero on the other side of the equals to sign. Now the formula to calculate the roots of the quadratic equation ax*x + bx + c = 0 is x = (-b + root of(b*b - 4*a*c) ) / 2 * a. The other root can be obtained by using the minus sign before the ...

How To: Use Green's Theorem to solve a line integral

This three part video walks you through using Green's theorem to solve a line integral. This excellent video shows you a clean blackboard, with the instructors voice showing exactly what to do. Don't fret, any question you may have, will be answered. Watching this video will make you feel like your back in the classroom but rather comfortably from your home.

How To: Use rise over run to graph a straight line

In this video the tutor shows how to graph a straight line using the rise over run method. The rise over run trick allows you to graph a straight line as long as you have a starting point and a slope value in the form of a fraction. The first step is to graph the starting point. In the second step he states that the numerator of the slope is rise and the denominator of the slope is run. He says that the rise is vertical and the run is horizontal and shows how do rise and run using those value...

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