How To: Remember "greater than" & "less than" symbols

This video shows you how to easily remember "greater than" and "less than" math symbols. The first thing you have to remember is that "less than" symbol looks like the letter L ("less than" symbol is "<"). When you see this sign, remember that < looks like L and means "less than". The other symbol, "greater than" does not look like the letter L, therefore it cannot be "less than" and it's easier to remember. The "greater than" symbol is ">". That's it! Good Luck!

How To: Calculate the area of a parallelogram

Calculating The Area Of A Parallelogram A parallelogram is a 4-sided shape formed by two pairs of parallel lines. Opposite sides are equal in length and opposite angles are equal in measure. To find the area of a parallelogram, multiply the base by the height. The formula is:

How To: Find percent by mass & percent composition

In chemistry you come across problems which ask you to find the percent by mass and percent composition of each element in a chemical compound. To do this the first step is to compute the molar mass. Use the periodic table to look up the mass of individual atoms and multiply it by the number of atoms to find the mass of that element. Now add up all the masses to arrive at the molar mass of the compound. Now to find the percent composition of an element divide the total mass of each element by...

How To: Find a number given Its percent

This how-to video is about how to find a number when its percent is given. This video is really helpful and effective in finding the number when the percent is given, the following steps are explained in the video to find the number when its percent is given:

How To: Divide small numbers by big numbers

This is a mathematical educational video on how to divide a small number by a larger number. You are aware that it is easy to divide a larger number by a small number. For example, if you want to divide 379 by 9 it is easy to do so. But if you have to divide 9 by 379 it is a bit difficult. You have to add a zero and see if you can divide. You need to add one more zero so that you can divide 900 by 379. But you should know that the answer would start like this 0.0 as we have added 2 zeros alre...

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Find the area & perimeter of triangles & squares

When you are figuring the area of a square, you only need to know the height and width of the shape. Once you know the height and width, multiply them to get the area of the square. To find the perimeter of the square, add all four sides together. To find the area of a triangle, multiply together two of the sides (not the hypotenuse) and then multiply that figure by 1/2. To find the perimeter of the triangle, add all three sides together.

How To: Make Potassium Chlorate from Ordinary Household Bleach and Salt Substitute

If you're not just a chemistry nerd, but also a firearms freak and explosives nut, then this home brew chemistry concoction is just what you need for some cheap homemade potassium chlorate. It's a mixture of potassium, chlorine and oxygen (KClO3) and is used for such things as gun primers, propellents, and explosives (when mixed with the appropriate fuel). And guess what? NurdRage is going to show you the steps for this makeshift potassium chlorate.

How To: Find the 100th term in a sequence

Need to find the nth term in a given arithmetic sequence? See how it's done with this free video math lesson. Need help finding the From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's seri...

How To: Find the area of a triangle when given 2 sides & angle

This video shows you how to easily find the area of a triangle when you know the length of 2 sides and the angle between them. The first thing you have to do is mark the sides of the triangle by a, b, c, where a is the side between A and B, b is the side between B and C and c is the side between C and A. If you know 2 of these 3 sides an you know the angle between them you can find the area of the triangle very simple: Area= (a x b x sin c)/2, where a, b are the two sides and c is the angle b...

How To: Find the coordinate of a point

In this video the author shows how to plot a point on the coordinate plane. He explains about the coordinate plane and shows how to read and write points to it with an example. He says that any point on the coordinate plane has an x, y- coordinate values. He says that for any point its projection on the x-axis is its x-coordinate and the points projection on y-axis is its y-coordinate. He shows how to find this out for a sample value and plots the coordinates of it. In this video the author u...

How To: Solve a line integral over a closed path

Line integrals will no longer be the feared terrorist of the math world thanks to this helpful guide from the Khan Academy. Marvel at the ease in which the integral is taken over a closed path and solved definitively. Then take out a sheet of paper and see if you can do the same.

How To: Perform simple reflux in the chemistry lab

The Interactive Lab Primer (ILP) has been developed as part of the Royal Society of Chemistry Teacher Fellowship Scheme, one of the themes of the Chemistry for Our Future program, and initiative which aims to secure a strong and sustainable future for the chemical sciences in higher education. The aim of the ILP is to address the diverse range of experience and skills students bring with them to a university by offering a resource to support their transition from school to the university chem...

How To: Write A Letter From Teachers To Parents

Parental involvement is a crucial ingredient in the success of many children. Teachers know the saying all too well that it takes more than a village to raise a child, for one - it takes parental involvement. Thus, it is important for teachers to reach out to parents in that first week of school. Teachers should write a formal letter that is welcoming and easily comprehensible to the parent and the student. This letter should be able to communicate that the teacher values the child’s educatio...

How To: Do long division without a calculator

This video shows you step by step how to do long division without the use of a calculator. The video shows viewers two different ways to solve a division problem. It first shows how to do the problem the traditional way, then it shows how to do it according to the long division process. The long division process is where you write the whole division, multiplication, and subtraction process out showing all your work. Long division is mainly used when dividing large numbers. There are three com...

How To: Find a slope of a straight line with: Ax + By + C = 0

In this video the instructor shows how to find the slope of an equation which is in the form Ax + By + C = 0. He says that the formula to find the slope of a line in the above form is slope m = -A/B, where A and B are the numeric constants of the variables x and y in the given equation. He goes on and further shows how to do this with a couple of examples. He shows how to reduce any equation into the general form and how to apply the slope formula then. This video shows how to find the slope ...

How To: Figure out the domain & range of a piecewise function

Need to calculate the domain and range of a graphed piecewise function? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Make nitric acid

Watch this science video tutorial from Nurd Rage on how to make nitric acid. They show three ways to make nitric acid based on two different chemical approaches, both of which can be done using easily accessible materials.

How To: Solve equations with the order of operations

In mathematics, the order of operations define the priority in which complex equations are solved. The top priority is your parenthesis, then exponents, followed by multiplication and division, and finally addition and subtraction (PEMDAS). This video tutorial demonstrates the order of operation with various examples and explains the associated methodology. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autod...

How to Be Your Own SpaceX: Design, Build & Test Liquid-Fueled Rocket Engines

Move over NASA— SpaceX is taking over. Well, not really. But today, the privately funded spacecraft company broke all expectations when their Dragon capsule fell to a soft landing in the Pacific Ocean, completing an undoubtedly successful demo flight of nearly two full trips around Earth. It was the first re-entry of a commercial spacecraft ever, bringing commercial space transportation closer to reality.

How To: Find the slope of a line given 2 points with fractions

In this video tutorial the instructor shows how to find the slope of a line given two points with fractional values. To do this first name your two points as point 1 with coordinates as x1, y1 and point 2 with coordinates x2, y2. Then substitute the values in the equation of the slope which is slope m = (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1). Now all you have to do is simply the fraction after substituting the point values. Be careful about the signs while substituting in the formula. Now finally after solvin...

How To: Find the area of a circle with a given radius

This video describes how to find the area of a circle given a radius of 4cm. The video begins by describing the formulas needed to find the area of the circle. The narrator cautions the viewer on a few common mistakes that people frequently make while using these formulas, such as not properly squaring the radius of the circle. The solution to the formula for a 4cm radius is 50.24 cm^2. The video then demonstrates that this value makes sense by overlaying a grid onto the circle and visually s...

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Be a human calculator

Before we had the calculator and before we had the abacus we had the human brain to complete our math problems for us. Remember that? Well, it seems that few of us do, resorting to calculators on our phone for elementary subtraction problems and multiplication.

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