Hot Education Posts

How To: Find the area of a triangle when given 2 sides & angle

This video shows you how to easily find the area of a triangle when you know the length of 2 sides and the angle between them. The first thing you have to do is mark the sides of the triangle by a, b, c, where a is the side between A and B, b is the side between B and C and c is the side between C and A. If you know 2 of these 3 sides an you know the angle between them you can find the area of the triangle very simple: Area= (a x b x sin c)/2, where a, b are the two sides and c is the angle b...

How To: Do long division with decimals

Video Nerd thinks that when your doing long division with decimals you should first take out the decimal. Write the number as if it didn't have a decimal. For example if the problem was 12.5 divided by 5 then you will just use 125 and divide that by 5. Next divide the first digit of the dividend by the divisor an write the number up top. Next you multiply, after your done multiplying the numbers subtract, and when your done subtracting the numbers drop the reaming numbers in the dividend down...

How To: Use a Peltier module to create free electricity from heat

A Peltier module allows you to turn heat into electricity. Because you can place it in areas that are normally warm anyway, the electricity created is "free" in a sense, though it does work best when one side of the module is cold and the other is hot. In other words, all you'll need for this project is the Peltier module and a cooler surface such as soil or water, and a warm area such as a well lit window or warm pan.

How To: Solve for the missing ratios or proportions

In this video the tutor shows how to solve the missing ratios or proportions. He explains it with an example, where a number in one of the ratios is missing and he intends to find this value. He shows the example of cross multiplication, where you multiply the values on the either side of the equation diagonally and finally solves the equation which results in the value of the unknown value. This is an introductory video explaining how to use rations and proportions to find missing values.

How To: Find the coordinate of a point

In this video the author shows how to plot a point on the coordinate plane. He explains about the coordinate plane and shows how to read and write points to it with an example. He says that any point on the coordinate plane has an x, y- coordinate values. He says that for any point its projection on the x-axis is its x-coordinate and the points projection on y-axis is its y-coordinate. He shows how to find this out for a sample value and plots the coordinates of it. In this video the author u...

How To: Calculate weight if given the mass

The video shows how to calculate weight if the mass is given and vice versa.Later on in this unit you will learn about Newton's laws of motion and Newton's second law of motion gives us a way to change mass into weight and vice versa.This law will tell you what is happening to objects when the net force on the object is not equal to zero and the easy way to say what will happen is that the object will accelerate.But how much the object accelerates depends on two things,firstly the mass of the...

How To: Measure the volume of a balloon

Here we will demonstrate how to measure the volume of a balloon. A balloon is not a straight edged polygon shape, usually, so the mathematical equations get that much harder, on the flip side, it may be a spherical or ovalish shape, but measurements with math alone are detrimental due to the uneven sizes of the balloon. Here is how to do it properly. You will need a bucket, preferably, to hold water, a larger container than your original bucket, and a measuring container. Place the bucket ins...

How To: Make hydrochloric acid from salt

In this tutorial, we learn how to make hydrochloric acid from salt. First, you will pour some salt into a distil flask. After this, you will add in some concentrated sulfuric acid to the salt. Next, you will let these react with each other. You will start to see gasses bubble up and the excess hydrogen chloride gas come out through the top of the tube. To create a stronger reaction, you can add heat underneath the reaction. Then, test this by exposing it to ammonium chloride. If it's the righ...

How To: Solve problems involving deductive reasoning

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to unpack and solve word problems that require you to apply deductive reasoning.

How To: Divide decimals

Here we are, learning how to divide decimals. So we are dividing a whole number or a fraction by a fraction. How this presenter does this is by moving the decimal two places to the right on both the top and bottom of the sum. In other words, he multiplies the two numbers by 100. So 2 becomes 200 and .25 becomes 25. So much easier to divide 200 by 25 than to divide 2 by .25. Provided you've multiplied both the top and bottom by the same amount, the result will be the same, because the relative...

How To: Solve a problem that asks you to identify percent, amount and base

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps. With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to solve simple percent problems in basic arithmetic.

How To: Calculate sums in standard form

When a number is expressed in the form of x multiplied by 10^y such that, x < 10 and y is an integer, the number is said to be in standard form. Standard form of expressing numbers finds its use in scientific and statistical fields. This video demostrates how to express, as well as perform basic mathematical operations namely, addition/subtraction, multiplication and division of numbers in the standard form using four examples/mathematical problems. The first two examples demostrate multiplic...

How To: Determine if a point lies on a line in standard form

In this video, we learn how to determine if a point lies on a line in standard form. In order to do this, you will need to substitute the X and Y value with the ordered pair that is given. The X value is the first number and the Y value is the second number. Re-write your equation, substituting in the numbers to the appropriate spots. Now, simplify the equation by doing multiplication with the negatives and positives (if given). When you get through the equation, you will end up with the solu...

How To: Prove the log a + log b = log ab logarithm property

See how to prove the log a + log b = log ab logarithmic property with this free video math lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll...

How To: Convert Fahrenheit to Celsius for chemistry

This is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to convert Fahrenheit to Celsius for chemistry. Doing this is really simple and easy and doesn't take much time. But, you must know the formula for doing the conversion. The formula is degrees Celsius is equal to degrees Fahrenheit minus 32 divided by 1.8. Using this formula let us convert 75 degrees Fahrenheit to degrees Celsius. Inserting 75 in the formula, we get (75 - 32) divided by 1.8. and the answer is ...

How To: Find the lowest common multiple/LCM with a factor tree

This video lesson demonstrates how to find the lowest common multiple/lowest common denominator (LCM/LCD) using factor trees. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Add and subtract variables

Math Problem Generator gives a video about how to add and subtract variables. All you have to do is combine the coefficient, which is the number that comes before the variable. The numbers are added or subtracted but the variable remains the same. In the video, the example given is 9x + 6x - x. First you add 9x + 6x, giving you 15x. The equation is now 15x - x. If a variable has no number written in front of it, that means the value is 1. So the equation is 15x - 1x and that is equal to 14x.

How To: Identify the numerical coefficient of a monomial

In this tutorial the instructor discusses about the numeric coefficients that we come across while we work with polynomials. He goes on to discuss the numerical coefficient of a monomial stating that it is the number that is present before the variable in the monomial. He states that the numerical coefficient can also be negative or if there is no number present in front of the variable, it indicates that the numerical coefficient is one. This video helps in understanding what the numerical c...

How To: Simplify a complex fraction w/ binomial denominators

To simplify a complex fraction, turn it into one fraction on the top divided into a fraction on the bottom. Once this is complete, you will turn the division into the two into a multiple by the reciprocal, factor, and then cancel. To make a division, find the lowest common denominator of both the top and the bottom. Once you get this division equation, look carefully at the equations. If something can be easily canceled, go ahead and cancel it out at this time. If you cannot cancel anything a...

How To: Evaluate exponential expressions in algebra

Need some help figuring out how to solve exponential expressions in algebra? See how it's done with this free video algebra lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Use differentiation equations to solve for position

This video teaches how to use calculus find the position, velocity and acceleration of an object. Imagine an object moving on a straight line. It's position at any time (t) is given as s(t) pronounced "s of t". It's velocity is v(t)= s'(t) which is the derivative of s(t). It's acceleration a(t) is the derivative of its velocity v'(t). If we look at it from a different perspective we are differentiating. The derivative of the position is its velocity, the derivative of its velocity is it accel...

How To: Compare exponential expressions

In this video the tutor shows how to compare exponential expressions and judge if they are equivalent. He shows how to do this using examples to simply exponential expressions. Now after simplifying the numerator and denominator separately he reduces the fraction to arrive at a simple value. Now using this simple values we can compare them and judge if both their values are equivalent. This video gives a good introduction on how to simplify the exponential expression and how to compare them a...

How To: Convert fractions to percents in two steps

This video shows you how to easily convert fractions to percents. You can convert fractions to percents in 2 easy steps. The first step is multiplying the fraction by 100 (e.g.. your fraction is 3/5; 3/5 x 100 = 3/5 x 100/1 = 300/5). The second step is reducing the fraction, when possible (e.g.. 3/5 x 100/1 = 300/5 = 60). Don't forget to add the percent sign (%)(you obtained 60%). That's it! Good Luck!

How To: Find molar mass

It’s time for science. You are able to calculate the molar mass for a compound using the periodic table and the amount of compound involved. You might need to know this in your everyday life but you will definitely need this in a chemistry class.