How To: Find the coordinate of a point

In this video the author shows how to plot a point on the coordinate plane. He explains about the coordinate plane and shows how to read and write points to it with an example. He says that any point on the coordinate plane has an x, y- coordinate values. He says that for any point its projection on the x-axis is its x-coordinate and the points projection on y-axis is its y-coordinate. He shows how to find this out for a sample value and plots the coordinates of it. In this video the author u...

How To: Solve a quadratic equation with a graphing calculator

This video walks you through the steps of solving quadratic equations with a graphing calculator. This excellent video shows you a clean blackboard, with the instructors voice showing exactly what to do. Don't fret, any question you may have, will be answered. Watching this video will make you feel like your back in the classroom but rather comfortably from your home.

How To: Make a Sugar Snake from Sulfuric Acid and Sugar

Sugar (a carbohydrate) is dehydrated with concentrated sulfuric acid. Since a carbohydrate was once considered just hydrated carbon, if you remove the water, carbon would be left over. The acid rips the water out of the sugar and the heat generated by this reaction causes the water to turn to steam. A black mass of carbon is produced.

How To: Find the volume of a solid object

This video shows the process of finding the volume of solid. The video is simple and easy to comprehend. The video takes the example of a rectangular solid and a solid cylinder to explain the method to find the volume. The video shows the step by step method to find the volume. The first step involves finding the area of base. After this, the area is multiplied by the height to find the volume. The unit of measurement is also taken into account in the video.

How To: Use a TI-89 to calculate nCr

This video shows you how to do a mathematical representation on computing the nCr function using a TI-89 calculator. You can write the nCr notation in different forms. It can be simplified from nCr to C(n,r). The symbol can either be read "n choose r" or "n taken r at a time" which are from it's probability applications. On the example to find "26 choose 17", go to the Home screen of the TI-89 calculator and then go 2nd 5 which is Math. Go choose probability and then to nCr to type in (26,17)...

How To: Calculate the acceleration of a car on inclined plane

In this video tutorial the instructor shows how to calculate the acceleration of a car on an inclined plane. He goes on to solve a problem he came across which is based on the acceleration of a car on an inclined plane. He shows how to solve this problem by showing how to extract the data from the question and draws a diagram to get a clear understanding of the problem. Now he marks the forces acting on the vehicle and goes on to specify his axes and how to split the components of force along...

How To: Build a homemade telescope

There is no greater, simpler pleasure than having a picnic with your boyfriend or girlfriend at night in a deserted park while gazing at the night sky. Unfortunately, you probably can't see much of the night sky anymore because of all the light pollution in the city.

How To: Find a transformation matrix with respect to a basis

Learn how to find a transformation matrix with respect to a non-standard basis in linear algebra. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Make bubbles from a CD

Mr. G teaches us how to make bubbles from a CD in this episode of "Do Try This at Home". You will need: a CD, screwdriver, and lighter or candle. Procedure: Use the screwdriver to scrape the aluminum coating from the CD until you get a clear plastic (polycarbonate). Heat an area underneath the CD slowly until the plastic is melted. Blow on the heated portion of the CD until you get a bubble. You may detach the bubble or leave the it on the CD. Heat and blow other portions of the CD to get new...

How To: Here's How You Can Make a Real Difference in the Aftermath of the Michael Brown & Eric Garner Grand Jury Decisions

In the aftermath of the unindicted police killings of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, we've been told that the system worked as intended. When our legal system's outcome is at conflict with what a majority of Americans believe is just, it's clear that some changes are needed. But what specifically needs to change? And what can an average citizen with a moral and just cause do to prevent these kinds of tragedies from repeating themselves again and again?

How To: Write a multiplication problem in exponential notation

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to write a multiplication problem as an exponent problem.

How To: Find the area of a parallelogram using geometry

The video shows us how to find the area of parallelogram using geometry. Here in this video it is done by using an example where the parallelogram is given ABCD. The area of the parallelogram is base times height (bh). Here the base is given as 15 but the height is not known but it is represented by the segment BD. To find the value of h, let’s use right triangle BDC on the right side of the figure. Since base is 15 and the opposite side of the parallelogram is congruent, the hypotenuse of th...

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Make slime without using borax

This video shows you how to make slime, or goo, without using borax which can be harsh on some people's skin. Rather than spending money on buying slime for your children in the toy store, simply mix water and cornstarch. You can even make it any color you want just by adding food coloring. Make slime without using borax.

How To: Do long division without a calculator

This video shows you step by step how to do long division without the use of a calculator. The video shows viewers two different ways to solve a division problem. It first shows how to do the problem the traditional way, then it shows how to do it according to the long division process. The long division process is where you write the whole division, multiplication, and subtraction process out showing all your work. Long division is mainly used when dividing large numbers. There are three com...

How To: Find extra points for a parabola (quadractic equation)

This is a mathematical educational video on how to find extra points for a parabola. In the first two examples there is no need for finding extra points as they have five points and have zeros of the parabola. In example 3 we need to find extra points. The equation is y=4xsquare-4x+4. You can take x= -1 and get the value for y. You will get a point now. Similarly you can substitute -2 for x in the same equation and get the value for y. Now you get another point. Now you can draw the parabola.

How To: Find the area of irregular shapes

This video explains how to find the area of irregular shapes. Draw the shape on a grid or graph paper. This will help you divide your shape into pieces. Draw dotted lines to divide the shape into squares, rectangles or triangles. For instance, if you have an "L" shape, you can divide the shape into two rectangles. Be sure your shapes do not overlap. Calculate the area of each individual shape. The graph paper will help you determine the length and width of each shape. Add the resulting areas ...

How To: Find the length of a median in a trapezoid

In this tutorial video the author shows how to find the length of the median of a trapezoid. He starts to show that we first need to add the sum of the parallel sides of the trapezoid which are on the either side of the median. Now this obtained value is to be divided by two to get the length of the median. He explains that the length of the median of a trapezoid is nothing but the average of the lengths of the parallel sides of the trapezoid. If you want to learn how to find the length of th...

How To: Find the formula of a piecewise function given a graph

This video shows how to find the formula of a piecewise function when given a graph. The first step is to write a definition for the graph, which is done by identifying the different domains shown in the graph. The second step is writing formulas for each domain specified by the lines in the graph. The point-slope formula is used to identify the slope and y-intercept for the leftmost domain, which has a sloped line. A point and horizontal line make for simpler equations in the other pieces of...

How To: Figure out the domain & range of a piecewise function

Need to calculate the domain and range of a graphed piecewise function? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Rotate a shape about the origin 90° counter-clockwise

Davitily thinks that you can learn to rotate the images quite easily. In this video Davitily explains the process of rotating a geometrical shape about the origin. This rotation is counter-clockwise. Davitily explains the various steps involved in this process. Two steps are explained in this process. The explanation is very simple and done in a very interesting manner. This video is the perfect choice for people wanting to learn the rotation of shapes. This video is a must for people interes...

How To: Calculate the area of complex shapes

Watch this video to learn how to calculate the area inside complex figures--shapes composed of multiple smaller, simpler shapes. The first step is to break the shape into its simpler component shapes. Then, using the information you have about the large shape, find all information you can about the smaller ones: base, height, etc. Next, find the areas of the smaller component shapes. Finally, add the areas of each of the component shapes together to find the area of the complex shape. Now you...

How To: Square expressions involving radicals

Here we look at squaring expressions that involve radicals because people tend to make some common mistakes while solving such expressions. Take 5 times the square root of y quantity squared, the answer here is not 5y. Here's the reason, square means to multiply something with itself so the square of 5 root y would be 5 root y into 5 root y. So 5 x 5 is 25 and under root y into under root y equals just y so the answer will be 25y.

How To: Isolate the sugar in a can of soda

In this video from ScienceOnTheBrain we learn how to isolate the sugar in a can of soda. To find out how much sugar is in soda, pour a can into a pot and boil it until all the water is gone. You will be left with the sugar, and then you can weigh it. First weigh your pot before pouring the soda in. Now boil the soda on the stovetop. When the water evaporates, you'll be left with a syrupy sugar. A can of soda has 39 grams of sugar in it. That equates to about 7 1/2 teaspoons. Fruit juice conta...

How To: Learn Calculus in 20 minutes

Did you sleep all semester in your Calculus class? Are you just waking up now to realize you have a test on Monday and that you're totally screwed? Well, luckily you can learn an entire semester worth of Calculus in just twenty minutes... or at leasts that's the hope.

How To: Simplify fourth roots

In this video the instructor shows how to find out the fourth roots of a number. The properties of fourth root says that for any positive number of a, its fourth roots are real. And for any negative value a, its fourth roots are not real. So split the number inside the fourth root as the product of two perfect squares and then cancel out the power with the fourth root giving its roots. As the fourth roots of a positive number are real, the answer you get is correct. But you cannot find out th...

How To: Calculate weight if given the mass

The video shows how to calculate weight if the mass is given and vice versa.Later on in this unit you will learn about Newton's laws of motion and Newton's second law of motion gives us a way to change mass into weight and vice versa.This law will tell you what is happening to objects when the net force on the object is not equal to zero and the easy way to say what will happen is that the object will accelerate.But how much the object accelerates depends on two things,firstly the mass of the...

How To: Find the 100th term in a sequence

Need to find the nth term in a given arithmetic sequence? See how it's done with this free video math lesson. Need help finding the From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's seri...