Hot Education Posts

How To: Find molar mass

It’s time for science. You are able to calculate the molar mass for a compound using the periodic table and the amount of compound involved. You might need to know this in your everyday life but you will definitely need this in a chemistry class.

How To: Do long division with decimals

Video Nerd thinks that when your doing long division with decimals you should first take out the decimal. Write the number as if it didn't have a decimal. For example if the problem was 12.5 divided by 5 then you will just use 125 and divide that by 5. Next divide the first digit of the dividend by the divisor an write the number up top. Next you multiply, after your done multiplying the numbers subtract, and when your done subtracting the numbers drop the reaming numbers in the dividend down...

How To: Use gentian violet to reveal latent fingerprints

This video would be very interesting for those seeking careers or those interested in the field of criminal science. This field involves forensic science. The video explains to us how to use gentian violet in order reveal latent fingerprints. He explains to us the experiment he is about to do before he does it. Genetian violet is a type of dye solution that can be very helpful in retrieving fingerprints. Safety goggles and gloves should be worn at all times.

How To: Solve equations with the order of operations

In mathematics, the order of operations define the priority in which complex equations are solved. The top priority is your parenthesis, then exponents, followed by multiplication and division, and finally addition and subtraction (PEMDAS). This video tutorial demonstrates the order of operation with various examples and explains the associated methodology. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autod...

How To: Find a number given Its percent

This how-to video is about how to find a number when its percent is given. This video is really helpful and effective in finding the number when the percent is given, the following steps are explained in the video to find the number when its percent is given:

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Use a Peltier module to create free electricity from heat

A Peltier module allows you to turn heat into electricity. Because you can place it in areas that are normally warm anyway, the electricity created is "free" in a sense, though it does work best when one side of the module is cold and the other is hot. In other words, all you'll need for this project is the Peltier module and a cooler surface such as soil or water, and a warm area such as a well lit window or warm pan.

How To: Do long division without a calculator

This video shows you step by step how to do long division without the use of a calculator. The video shows viewers two different ways to solve a division problem. It first shows how to do the problem the traditional way, then it shows how to do it according to the long division process. The long division process is where you write the whole division, multiplication, and subtraction process out showing all your work. Long division is mainly used when dividing large numbers. There are three com...

How To: Calculate the area of a parallelogram

Calculating The Area Of A Parallelogram A parallelogram is a 4-sided shape formed by two pairs of parallel lines. Opposite sides are equal in length and opposite angles are equal in measure. To find the area of a parallelogram, multiply the base by the height. The formula is:

How To: Write a sum/difference of logarithms as a logarithm

To write the sum or difference of logarithms as a single logarithm, you will need to learn a few rules. The rules are ln AB = ln A + ln B. This is the addition rule. The multiplication rule of logarithm states that ln A/b = ln A - ln B. The third rule of logarithms that deals with exponents states that ln (M power r) = r * ln M. Using these three rules you can simplify any expression that involves logarithms to arrive at a single logarithm. The instructor shows how to apply these rules to a f...

How To: Make Your Own Homemade Glow Sticks

Glow sticks, a popular favor at parties and outdoor events, and a must-have on Halloween, can be traced back to the United States Navy in the mid-1960s. The military desired improved visibility during night operations, and glow sticks, with their small-size portability and lack of batteries, were a perfect tactical solution.

How To: Measure the volume of a balloon

Here we will demonstrate how to measure the volume of a balloon. A balloon is not a straight edged polygon shape, usually, so the mathematical equations get that much harder, on the flip side, it may be a spherical or ovalish shape, but measurements with math alone are detrimental due to the uneven sizes of the balloon. Here is how to do it properly. You will need a bucket, preferably, to hold water, a larger container than your original bucket, and a measuring container. Place the bucket ins...

How To: Convert Fahrenheit to Celsius for chemistry

This is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to convert Fahrenheit to Celsius for chemistry. Doing this is really simple and easy and doesn't take much time. But, you must know the formula for doing the conversion. The formula is degrees Celsius is equal to degrees Fahrenheit minus 32 divided by 1.8. Using this formula let us convert 75 degrees Fahrenheit to degrees Celsius. Inserting 75 in the formula, we get (75 - 32) divided by 1.8. and the answer is ...

How To: Find a slope of a line parallel/perpendicular to it

This video tells you how to find a slope of a parallel / perpendicular to it. In the equation y = mx + c, m is the slope. To calculate the slope of a line that is parallel to another line, you have to consider the rule m1 = m2 which means slope of the first line m1 is equal to the second line m2, if both the lines are parallel. Take the equation y = 2/3x - 7.2/3 is the slope. According to the rule m1 = 2/3 and so m2 = 2/3.Now to calculate the slope of perpendicular line you have another rule ...

How To: Revive a drowned fly

Ever wished you were Jesus? This how-to video can bestow you with life-reviving powers. It's not a trick. See how you can revive a seemingly drowned fly with salt by watching this educational and instructional video. Let the resurrection begin.

How To: Isolate the sugar in a can of soda

In this video from ScienceOnTheBrain we learn how to isolate the sugar in a can of soda. To find out how much sugar is in soda, pour a can into a pot and boil it until all the water is gone. You will be left with the sugar, and then you can weigh it. First weigh your pot before pouring the soda in. Now boil the soda on the stovetop. When the water evaporates, you'll be left with a syrupy sugar. A can of soda has 39 grams of sugar in it. That equates to about 7 1/2 teaspoons. Fruit juice conta...

How To: Do normal probability calculations on a calculator

Probability computation is a complex process and even using a calculator can be difficult. But normal probability calculations can be performed quickly with the help of calculator once you know how to use it. So when you have to calculate a probability from a normal distribution you can use the functions on your scientific calculator. You can use the normal CDF function from you calculator to compute the area under a normal curve. The function requires lower band and upper band values, the me...

How To: Find the surface area of an aluminum can or cylinder

This video tells us the method to find the surface area of an aluminium can or cylinder. The surface area includes the outside area of the curved portion and the aluminium top and bottom. The formula to find area is the multiple of 2, pi, r, r+h or (2)(pi)(r)(r+h). The radius of the cylinder is the radius of the circular top or bottom. In the example shown in the video, the radius is 4 inches and the height is 12 inches. Substituting the values in the formula, we get the surface area as (2)(3...

How To: Use a protractor to make a pie chart

If you have a circular or semicircular protractor like the one used in this video, making a pie chart is as easy as – well — pie. This will teach you how to use your protractor to measure out each individual slice in your pie chart. Learn how to visualize statistical data through hand-drawn pie charts with this free video math lesson.

How To: Evaluate a line integral along a straight line segment

This video tutorial is in the Education category which will show you how to evaluate a line integral along a straight line segment using the definition of the line integral. This video evaluates a line integral along a straight line segment using a parametric representation of the curve (using a vector representation of the line segment) and then integrating. A vector representation of a line that starts at r0 and ends at r1 is r(t) = (1-t)r0 + tr1 where t is greater than equal to 0 and lesse...

How To: Make your own thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates

The price of TLC plates can add up. See how to make thin-layer chromatography plates (TLC plates) for a few cents each that are as good as commercial TLC plates that sell for a dollar or two each. You can use these home-made TLC plates the same way you'd use chromatography paper, but the plates provide sharper separations and require far less analyte. They also lie flat, and are much easier to store for later reference. For more information, including step-by-step instructions, and to get sta...

How To: Find least common multiple in rational expressions

This series walks you through the steps of finding the least common multiple in rational expressions. This excellent video shows you a clean board, with the instructors voice showing exactly what to do. Don't fret, any question you may have, will be answered. Watching this video will make you feel like your back in the classroom but rather comfortably from your home.