Hot Education How-Tos

How To: Remember "greater than" & "less than" symbols

This video shows you how to easily remember "greater than" and "less than" math symbols. The first thing you have to remember is that "less than" symbol looks like the letter L ("less than" symbol is "<"). When you see this sign, remember that < looks like L and means "less than". The other symbol, "greater than" does not look like the letter L, therefore it cannot be "less than" and it's easier to remember. The "greater than" symbol is ">". That's it! Good Luck!

How To: Write A Letter From Teachers To Parents

Parental involvement is a crucial ingredient in the success of many children. Teachers know the saying all too well that it takes more than a village to raise a child, for one - it takes parental involvement. Thus, it is important for teachers to reach out to parents in that first week of school. Teachers should write a formal letter that is welcoming and easily comprehensible to the parent and the student. This letter should be able to communicate that the teacher values the child’s educatio...

How To: Do normal probability calculations on a calculator

Probability computation is a complex process and even using a calculator can be difficult. But normal probability calculations can be performed quickly with the help of calculator once you know how to use it. So when you have to calculate a probability from a normal distribution you can use the functions on your scientific calculator. You can use the normal CDF function from you calculator to compute the area under a normal curve. The function requires lower band and upper band values, the me...

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Find a number given Its percent

This how-to video is about how to find a number when its percent is given. This video is really helpful and effective in finding the number when the percent is given, the following steps are explained in the video to find the number when its percent is given:

How To: Find the area of a circle when you know the diameter

In this video, it is shown how to calculate the area of a circle where the diameter is given. The formula for calculating the area of a circle is pi multiplied by square of radius. Radius is actually half of the diameter. In this video, the diameter is given as 10.6 meters. Hence, the radius will be half of 10.6 which is equal to 5.3 meters. Now, to find the area we shall multiply pi with the square of 5.3. Square of 5.3 is 28.09. If we multiply 28.09 with pi we shall get the area of the circ...

How To: Find the area of a square or rectangle in geometry

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to find the area of a rectangle. The formula for finding the area of a rectangle is: A= b x h. The base is the horizontal bottom lie of the rectangle and the height is the vertical straight line of the rectangle. Whenever working with area, users must square the unit of measurement. To find the area of a square, multiple the side of the square twice (square it). This video will benefit those student viewers who are struggling with math, and are in nee...

How To: Calculate the height and volume of a pyramid

Need to know how to calculate the height and volume of a pyramid in geometry? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Make Your Own Homemade Glow Sticks

Glow sticks, a popular favor at parties and outdoor events, and a must-have on Halloween, can be traced back to the United States Navy in the mid-1960s. The military desired improved visibility during night operations, and glow sticks, with their small-size portability and lack of batteries, were a perfect tactical solution.

How To: Make Potassium Chlorate from Ordinary Household Bleach and Salt Substitute

If you're not just a chemistry nerd, but also a firearms freak and explosives nut, then this home brew chemistry concoction is just what you need for some cheap homemade potassium chlorate. It's a mixture of potassium, chlorine and oxygen (KClO3) and is used for such things as gun primers, propellents, and explosives (when mixed with the appropriate fuel). And guess what? NurdRage is going to show you the steps for this makeshift potassium chlorate.

How To: Find the area of a triangle when given 2 sides & angle

This video shows you how to easily find the area of a triangle when you know the length of 2 sides and the angle between them. The first thing you have to do is mark the sides of the triangle by a, b, c, where a is the side between A and B, b is the side between B and C and c is the side between C and A. If you know 2 of these 3 sides an you know the angle between them you can find the area of the triangle very simple: Area= (a x b x sin c)/2, where a, b are the two sides and c is the angle b...

How To: Find the formula of a piecewise function given a graph

This video shows how to find the formula of a piecewise function when given a graph. The first step is to write a definition for the graph, which is done by identifying the different domains shown in the graph. The second step is writing formulas for each domain specified by the lines in the graph. The point-slope formula is used to identify the slope and y-intercept for the leftmost domain, which has a sloped line. A point and horizontal line make for simpler equations in the other pieces of...

How To: Find and sketch the domain of a multivariable function

Looking for a primer on how to find and sketch the domain of a function z = f(x, y) in calculus? Learn how with this free video calc lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Find extra points for a parabola (quadractic equation)

This is a mathematical educational video on how to find extra points for a parabola. In the first two examples there is no need for finding extra points as they have five points and have zeros of the parabola. In example 3 we need to find extra points. The equation is y=4xsquare-4x+4. You can take x= -1 and get the value for y. You will get a point now. Similarly you can substitute -2 for x in the same equation and get the value for y. Now you get another point. Now you can draw the parabola.

How To: Make fireballs you can hold in your hand

This flame you CAN hold, without burning your skin off. Learn to make fireballs you can hold in your hand. This amazing video tutorial shows you how to do it. All you'll need for this little science experiment or fiery weapon is 100% cotton cloth, scissors, lighter fuel, cotton string, and a needle. Be careful to follow the directions in this how-to video carefully otherwise you'll really be playing with fire.

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Solve equations with the order of operations

In mathematics, the order of operations define the priority in which complex equations are solved. The top priority is your parenthesis, then exponents, followed by multiplication and division, and finally addition and subtraction (PEMDAS). This video tutorial demonstrates the order of operation with various examples and explains the associated methodology. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autod...

How To: Find the perimeter & area of a complex figure

In this video tutorial the author shows how to find the perimeter and area of a complex figure. He shows that a complex figure can be subdivided into standard geometric figures. In the current example he divides the complex figure into a rectangle and a triangle. Now he computes the perimeter by adding the three sides of the rectangle and the two sides of the triangle. Similarly he computes the individual areas of the rectangle and the triangle and finally adds then up to find the area of the...

How To: Find the standard deviation with the Z-Score formula

In this tutorial, we learn how to find the standard deviation with the Z-Score formula. First, take your problem and write it out one by one underneath each other. Then, you will need to substitute the numbers in for the variables that are in the problem. Once you do this, you will follow the basic rules of math to find out what the answer to the problem is appropriately. Once you have done this, finish off the problem to find the answer, then you will have found the standard deviation using ...

How To: Convert Fahrenheit to Celsius for chemistry

This is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to convert Fahrenheit to Celsius for chemistry. Doing this is really simple and easy and doesn't take much time. But, you must know the formula for doing the conversion. The formula is degrees Celsius is equal to degrees Fahrenheit minus 32 divided by 1.8. Using this formula let us convert 75 degrees Fahrenheit to degrees Celsius. Inserting 75 in the formula, we get (75 - 32) divided by 1.8. and the answer is ...

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