Hot Education How-Tos

How To: Remember "greater than" & "less than" symbols

This video shows you how to easily remember "greater than" and "less than" math symbols. The first thing you have to remember is that "less than" symbol looks like the letter L ("less than" symbol is "<"). When you see this sign, remember that < looks like L and means "less than". The other symbol, "greater than" does not look like the letter L, therefore it cannot be "less than" and it's easier to remember. The "greater than" symbol is ">". That's it! Good Luck!

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

Make Slime Without Borax: 5 Easy Recipes for Gooey Homemade Ooze

One of the only things I remember from watching Nickelodeon as a kid is the epic green slime. Looking back, I don't know what was so great about it, but every kid my age thought that being drenched in slime would be the coolest thing on earth. Of course, the first thing I did was beg my parents to buy me some fake slime, but I never knew I could've easily made my own at home. One of the most common ways to make slime is to combine liquid glue with water and a household chemical called borax. ...

How To: Write A Letter From Teachers To Parents

Parental involvement is a crucial ingredient in the success of many children. Teachers know the saying all too well that it takes more than a village to raise a child, for one - it takes parental involvement. Thus, it is important for teachers to reach out to parents in that first week of school. Teachers should write a formal letter that is welcoming and easily comprehensible to the parent and the student. This letter should be able to communicate that the teacher values the child’s educatio...

How To: Make Your Own Homemade Glow Sticks

Glow sticks, a popular favor at parties and outdoor events, and a must-have on Halloween, can be traced back to the United States Navy in the mid-1960s. The military desired improved visibility during night operations, and glow sticks, with their small-size portability and lack of batteries, were a perfect tactical solution.

How To: Apply the 4th Law of Exponents

This how-to video is about Fourth Law of Exponents. Before going to see this let's first know what the fourth law of exponent says. The fourth law of exponents says that "any value other than zero brought to an exponent of zero is equal to one".

How To: Find the area of a parallelogram using geometry

The video shows us how to find the area of parallelogram using geometry. Here in this video it is done by using an example where the parallelogram is given ABCD. The area of the parallelogram is base times height (bh). Here the base is given as 15 but the height is not known but it is represented by the segment BD. To find the value of h, let’s use right triangle BDC on the right side of the figure. Since base is 15 and the opposite side of the parallelogram is congruent, the hypotenuse of th...

How To: Find the formula of a piecewise function given a graph

This video shows how to find the formula of a piecewise function when given a graph. The first step is to write a definition for the graph, which is done by identifying the different domains shown in the graph. The second step is writing formulas for each domain specified by the lines in the graph. The point-slope formula is used to identify the slope and y-intercept for the leftmost domain, which has a sloped line. A point and horizontal line make for simpler equations in the other pieces of...

How To: Determine if a point lies on a line in slope intercept

In this video the author shows how to find out if a Point lies on a Line in Slope Intercept Form. He shows it by an example where he takes a point, which is an ordered pair in the form (x, y) and a line, which is an first degree equation. Now he substitutes the values of x and y in the equation and checks if both the sides of the equation match. If it matches we can conclude that the point lies on the line. By following the method given in this tutorial you can find out if a given point lies ...

How To: Build a wind turbine with PVC windmill blades

In this Education video tutorial you will learn how to build a wind turbine with PVC windmill blades. This project when completed will charge a 12V battery. You can turn a motor in to a generator. When you spin the shaft on the generator, electricity is generated. So you get a motor with a flywheel and attach the turbine blades to it. When the blades turn with wind action, electricity will be generated. Take PVC pipes, 8" in diameter and 24" long. Cut the blades out of the pipe as per directi...

How To: Make nitric acid

Watch this science video tutorial from Nurd Rage on how to make nitric acid. They show three ways to make nitric acid based on two different chemical approaches, both of which can be done using easily accessible materials.

How To: Make Potassium Chlorate from Ordinary Household Bleach and Salt Substitute

If you're not just a chemistry nerd, but also a firearms freak and explosives nut, then this home brew chemistry concoction is just what you need for some cheap homemade potassium chlorate. It's a mixture of potassium, chlorine and oxygen (KClO3) and is used for such things as gun primers, propellents, and explosives (when mixed with the appropriate fuel). And guess what? NurdRage is going to show you the steps for this makeshift potassium chlorate.

How To: Find the area of a circle when you know the diameter

In this video, it is shown how to calculate the area of a circle where the diameter is given. The formula for calculating the area of a circle is pi multiplied by square of radius. Radius is actually half of the diameter. In this video, the diameter is given as 10.6 meters. Hence, the radius will be half of 10.6 which is equal to 5.3 meters. Now, to find the area we shall multiply pi with the square of 5.3. Square of 5.3 is 28.09. If we multiply 28.09 with pi we shall get the area of the circ...

How To: Identify characteristics of a sample during a survey

To identify characteristics of a sample in your survey, there are many factors to consider of your samples. The first four characteristics you need to focus on are gender, age, income level, and education level. All four of these characteristics must be proportional to that of the population. You also need to consider the geographic location. Only take samples from the immediate geographical area. Finally, an important characteristic of the survey is the sample size. You do not want to ask to...

How To: Find the value of a variable in an algebraic equation

Need help figuring out how to solve simple algebraic equations? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Find the vertical asymptotes of a rational function

Need help figuring out how to find the vertical and horizontal asymptotes of a rational function? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Solve a problem that asks you to identify percent, amount and base

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps. With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to solve simple percent problems in basic arithmetic.

How To: Apply the 5th Law of Exponents

In this video the tutor explains the 5th Law of Exponents. He reminds the viewer that when polynomials are multiplied, their exponents get added. Now he states that when a polynomial is raised to another power, the exponents are multiplied instead of adding. The 5th Law of Exponents states that when a polynomial with a power 'a' is raised to a power 'b', then the final power of the exponents is the value of the product of the exponents, i.e., a * b. This video states the 5th Law of Exponents ...

How To: Solve population proportion problems in statistics

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps. With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to solve pop. proportion problems in stats.

How To: Solve systems by substitution

You can solve systems by using the substitution method. Here are two examples. One says y=3x+2 and the second says 7x-4y=7. The math teacher explains that if y is the same thing as 3x+2, then 3x+2 can be substituted for y in 7x-4y=7. Once it is substituted, your equation will then read 7x-4(3x+2)=7. The next step is to solve for x. Once you have worked out this equation, you will see that x=-3. Finally, your last step is to solve for y. To solve for y, simply substitute x with -3. The equatio...

How To: Make hydrogen gas & an explosion

First you need to make hydrogen gas which require a few material. Such as a glass bottle, a Full table spoon of aluminum (beer or soda can will work), a half a cup of cold water, a table spoon or two of caustic soda, a funnel, a medium size container of water, a way of cutting the aluminum, one or two balloon's, and some safety glasses just incase something goes wrong.

How To: Do long division without a calculator

This video shows you step by step how to do long division without the use of a calculator. The video shows viewers two different ways to solve a division problem. It first shows how to do the problem the traditional way, then it shows how to do it according to the long division process. The long division process is where you write the whole division, multiplication, and subtraction process out showing all your work. Long division is mainly used when dividing large numbers. There are three com...

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